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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Is there a different battery I could use to give me more cranking amps?

No, I don't have a built motor or anything like that. It's just so I can get the best/fastest cranking possible for XC racing. The series I'm gonna be racing (SCCS) uses a dead engine start. I'm thinking higher amps will help the engine to start faster. Am I right or wrong? If I'm right, what battery should I use?

roadkill
 

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roadkill,
One question. Does that type of racing require a "cold" engine? The reason I ask is if the engine is already warmed up starting is much easier and the engine is ready to go. No different battery is required. When not in use, always keep the machine on a Battery Tender. Oh, one other thing, don't freak out at the start of the race and try to have the throttle pressed before and during cranking. Probably will balk and quit. Just a thought.
Sid
 

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The Antigravity 12-Cell

The Antigravity 12-cell is very small but capable of incredible starting power. This model is a perfect replacement for the typical 1000-1200cc street bikes. It offers extreme weight saving over stock lead acid batteries but has almost twice the cranking amps of the standard battery found in a 1000cc bikes.
  • 360 CCA
  • 12 Amp Hours (PbEq)
  • 4.25″ Long x 3.0″ Wide x 4.25″ Tall
  • 2.3 lbs
  • For Race vehicles up to 1600cc
  • For Street Motorcycles up to 1300cc



Been using these for a while,, i can hook u up
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
roadkill,
One question. Does that type of racing require a "cold" engine? The reason I ask is if the engine is already warmed up starting is much easier and the engine is ready to go. No different battery is required. When not in use, always keep the machine on a Battery Tender. Oh, one other thing, don't freak out at the start of the race and try to have the throttle pressed before and during cranking. Probably will balk and quit. Just a thought.
Sid
No Sid, just dead engine. Engines are well warmed up before pulling up to start line... then engines are shut down and set ready to start (key in on and kill switch set to on) Can be in neutral or in gear... left hand on helmet till flag falls. A good hole shot start can make a big difference because some of the courses are tight and technical and passing can prove difficult.

roadkill
 

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does your engine not start straight away then?
All i do is press the starter hot or cold, no throttle and it instantly fires up..(as long as its in neutral as hot engine in gear, huge clutch drag and longer/slower starting)
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
does your engine not start straight away then?
All i do is press the starter hot or cold, no throttle and it instantly fires up..(as long as its in neutral as hot engine in gear, huge clutch drag and longer/slower starting)
Hmmm, how to answer. It does start up right away... couple seconds. But, if I could shave off even a fraction of a second because the starter is turning faster, could make a big difference.

Loaded up to go ride tomorrow and practice my dead engine start along with a couple friends who do dead engine starts in this series to see how my start compares to theirs.

roadkill
 

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roadkill,
If the starter requires 12VDC and needs X number of amps, the ampere capability of the battery will sustain that for a given duration. A battery with higher cranking amps will deliver only whatever the starter requires but for a greater duration. I may be wrong but I am not sure changing to a different battery will achieve what you are hoping for.
Need more inputs from other members.
Sid
 

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roadkill,
If the starter requires 12VDC and needs X number of amps, the ampere capability of the battery will sustain that for a given duration. A battery with higher cranking amps will deliver only whatever the starter requires but for a greater duration. I may be wrong but I am not sure changing to a different battery will achieve what you are hoping for.
Need more inputs from other members.
Sid
I agree with you there, unless the oem battery is underpowered for the starter motor..

One way to test this is disconnect the oem battery and connect a car battery with jump leads (do ""NOT"" have car engine runing as will fry rectifier/regulator) will be 100% ok otherwise.
Does it then crank faster ? Oem battery needs to be very good condition to do a fair comparison.
I have started my raptor off my car a fair few times over the years and can say that a car battery does not make it turn over any quicker..

the most important figure when comparing batterys is CCA (cold cranking amps)
That is - how many amps a battery at 32f (0 C) can deliver for 30 seconds and maintain at least 1.2 volts per cell (7.2 volts for a 12 volt battery).
Peukert's Law expresses the fact that the capacity available from a battery varies according to how rapidly it is discharged. A battery discharged at high rate will give fewer ampere hours than one discharged more slowly
 

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rappey,
Well stated.
Thanks for further clarification. The test you recommended is excellent.
Maybe a good project for the "Myth Busters".:tup:
Sid
 

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several friends of mine that are running ltr's are doing the 24v start, their bikes start faster than any other fuel injected bike I've seen. And where our bikes are harder to start in gear, it doesnt affect theirs now.
 

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try these batteries they work very well I have several on some high comp engines help quit abite I have learned to go one size larger than Joe recommends though. turntechbattery.com Beleive I have a 10 amp hour
Scott
 

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Sorry, I'm confused. :confused::confused: How can you use a 24VDC start with a 12VDC starter? I would think that would burn up the starter due to an overvoltage. Please enlighten me.
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Sorry, I'm confused. :confused::confused: How can you use a 24VDC start with a 12VDC starter? I would think that would burn up the starter due to an overvoltage. Please enlighten me.
Sid
It's not as simple as that. If a 12v starter takes 10 amps to run at full speed ,then a 24 volts it would only take 5 amps to do the same. Everybody thinks that a 24volt starter system is twice the power,it is and it isn't. I wish I could explain it. I'll try and get a guy ,I know at Dirtworks to help out on this one.
 

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Maybe this will help.. The voltage is what pushes the current (amps) around the circuit, and its the current that causes death, not voltage!
As baxter says, raise the voltage and the current needed is much less..

Take a 1.5kw kettle..

I= w/v I= amps , w=watts, v=volts..
So european system, 1500w divided by 240 volts = 6.25 amps
Usa system. 1500w divided by 120 volts = 12.5 amps


I see that USA is slowly catching up with the rest of the world by installing 240 volts in new builds, but by using two phases @60hz, so still no compatibility with the european 50hz single phase appliances..

So - by upping to 24v on starter motor you are halfing the current, therefore, at least on paper, making no difference to the starter.
A 12v motor should not have any problem at 24v due to the way these low voltage items work..

what i cant explain at the moment, is why @24v it would turn over quicker as some have stated, so will try to find out an answer for that.
 
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