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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
It's been a little over a year that I've had the 700xx and I've been through some pretty icky stuff over that year so I thought it would be a good thing if I checked my pads.

Good thing I did!

I haven't heard any squeaking, grinding or anything else "not right" coming from up front. But more on that later...

Here's what you'll need:

17mm socket - for the lug nuts
12mm socket - for the two bolts on the back of the caliper
10mm socket - for the plastic dust cover bolt
08mm Socket - for the pad retaining bolt
Large vice grips or a "C" clamp to compress the pistons
WD40 or lubricant to clear the debris from the pistons prior to compressing them back in.
Jack Stand to hold up your quad

1. loosen your lug nuts on your wheels.
2. Jack up your quad
3. Remove the lug nuts and the front wheels
4. Remove the dust cover's 10mm bolt
5. Loosen the 8mm pad-retainer bolt.
6. Loosen the 12mm bolts and remove the caliper minding that you don't twist the brake line too much. (these quads are new now, but in years to come these lines could tear)
7. Remove the 8mm pad retainer bolt.
8. Remove the outside pad only, not the pad that is touching the pistons.
9. Take your lubricant and clear away any dirt away from the outside of the piston.
10. Compress the pistons in by using the "C" clamp or vice grips, do this slowly. Make sure you're pushing (squeezing) against the old pad and not the piston itself; you'll want to make sure that it goes back in as straight as possible.
11. Once the pistons are fully inside the caliper you may remove the old pad.
12. Put the new pads in place, making sure the rear of the pad is snug and that you can pad retaining bolt can be inserted and finger tightened.
13. Slip the caliper back into place and put the 12mm bolts back in minding that the brake line is not kinked.
14. Tighten the 12mm bolts according to your manual's specifications.
15. Tighten the 8mm bolt, again according to your manual specifications.
16. Put the dust/mud cover back in place and...you guessed it...tighten to your manuals specifications.
17. Squeeze your brake lever and you should see the caliper adjust and slide into it's correct place. It should not feel spongy.
18. Put your wheels back on and torque to your manual's specifications.

Here's what my pad's looked like: Yikes!





Here's the part number of the pads I used:



Here's the sockets:





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Those are GONE!!!! Wow, Those should have sounded like the 4th of july out there screakin, gridin, poppin, snappin, and several other words that I dont know the meanin of. lol
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·

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Cool theres alot of 450 stuff that fits. Sooner than U actully thought!
 

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When I replaced the tires I noticed my front pads were almost worn out after only 40 hours:confused:.

You don't actually have to remove the calipers to change the front pads. I read in the manual:

Remove the white plastic sheild above the caliper.

Press the caliper body against the back side of the disc to reset the pistons ( I used 4" C-clamps).

Then you remove the 8mm pin from the caliper, and the pads just slide out the end of the caliper. You may want to take an air hose and blow out any debris inside the caliper.

Then just slide the new pads back into the end of the caliper, making sure they seat in the square recess on the other end.

Replace the 8mm pin and the plastic shield and you're done.

It is a more thorough process to remove the caliper, but it is not completely necesary.
 

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I found it easier to remove the calipers so I could clean the mud from around the pistons and 450r front pads and discs fit the T-ReX.
 

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Good luck with the EBC pads. My OEM Honda pads lasted about 300 miles. The severe duty EBC's lasted less than 50 miles. I have since replaced them with OEM Honda pads, have over 150 miles on them and they hardly show any wear.
 

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:stupid:I've always run EBC's without any problems or regrets.
 

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I'm just going by my experience on my 700 and my gf's 450. they got eaten up pretty fast.
 

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i just put some on mine, this past week! i bought my xx end of 08' and been through plenty of stuff, sand, mud, etc. they were bout gone too! havnt checked back yet, dont use back much! i got several friends, they on there second set of rear pads.
 

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Nice write up !!!

I did some research because of price curiosity, i never even checked the OEM ones, but from honda even with my discount, which is a joke becuase prices are same on most websites, you are gong to pay as follows...


06435-HP6-A01 Hondapad set, rr.
1$40.92 $36.94$36.94

06455-HP1-016 Hondapad set, fr.
2$32.50 $31.59$63.18 Subtotal$100.12 Standard Shipping$9.99 Tax$0.00 Total$110.11

Most aftermarket performnce brakes built to take racing conditions are $30 or less per set so your looking at under stock prices for a better product for sure...
 

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I go mine from eBay for really cheap. I don't remember how much though.

I hear that some stuff is soooo cheap on fleabay that I never buy ANYTHING without checking there first...I'm just saying your average price is about 30 bucks and it is well worth it, it's not like performance pads are twice as much they're actually cheaper because they mass sell them to racers...ya dig ?
 
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