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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I read this about a Fox air shock modification on another site...

The FOX air shox use nitrogen for the spring to change spring rates you adjust the amount of oil inside the reservoir body to do this you need to remove the nitrogen and valve stem or end cap, pour in more oil in the reservoir, cap it up and recharge the shock with nitrogen, by adding my adjustable end cap I can adjust a screw and increase or decrease the volume of the reservoir body and change the spring rates (compression ratio)with a turn of a wrench.

On second site, I was told this will not work because...

Remote rezzy on air shocks, moves the nitrogen/oil separation from the shock to the reservoir. That means the entire volume of oil displaced by a 1.25" shaft has to flow through a 1/8" NPT fitting. The oil can't move through that fitting so the suspension cannot move faster than when that flow maxes out.

So will this modification work or will it just trash a set of Fox shocks???
 

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I am kind of confused on what you are trying to do. When you say Fox air shock, are you taking about the Evols? If so, they don't use nitrogen for the spring, they use just regular air. (A pump is included to adjust.) They are already adjustable by using the pump. More pressure, higher spring rate and vice versa. The only place they use nitrogen is in the reservoir, and you wouldn't want to add oil there. You have to have an air space to allow for the displacement of oil as the shaft travels into the body of the shock.

That is for the Evols, maybe you are talking about another Fox air shock. If that is the case, then I am not familiar with that shock. Best bet would be to do what mervex mentioned and call Fox. Get the answer straight from the source.

Doug
 

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Sounds like some of the info you're getting is for an emulsion shock, like the big, long-travel, low-speed units on a rock crawler. These are different beasts altogether. They do use nitrogen, at fairly high pressures (400 psi or so, often).

Edit--So, if this is the air shock you're referring to, they're wildly different than a coilover like what we have.

http://ep.yimg.com/ca/I/yhst-29053237042699_2184_3379218

I'm guessing this is the type of shock the info you found is referring to, because you vary the actual "spring rate" by adjusting the oil volume in them. There is no conventional spring on these units. Internally, they've got very little in common with a normal shock, which only provides dampening.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
These are the stock rear shocks on the Honda FL400R pilot...
 

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These are the stock rear shocks on the Honda FL400R pilot...
Ok, but what are you trying to accomplish here? If you've got coilovers on your Pilot, then spring rate and ride height can only be adjusted by replacing the spring. If there shot and need rebuilt, you'll need someone in the know to rebuild and revalve them. To my knowledge, there aren't many adjustments to be made by adjusting the amount of oil in them. That only applies to true air shocks, like what's pictured in the link I posted above.
 
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