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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am a bit confused so maybe you can help. With the 23" Tires up front and 22" in back how does this help with the front end push? I would think it would put even more weight on the rear making more push. A little help please?
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Anyone? 25 people viewed this and no responses lol. I am really curious
 

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The taller tire with more agressive tread just bites into the ground more. The 23inch tire also goes over logs/rocks/whatever alot easier. I can't explain the exact science, but i can verify that it does work... works quite well.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I understand the climbing part and I don't doubt that it helps the push from what everyone says I was just curious how it worked. Thx though
 

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Less force/weight is directed towards the ground by elevating the front....
This in mind...
1. Our tires are run at low psi, compress, and grip well.
2.When we brake or initiate a turn the front suspention is going to "dive" a bit placing the front of the bike lower than the rear of the bike.(realativly) Not to mention our low psi tires compress further lowering the bike.
3.This is due to the new force (direction change) applied to the bike. If the front is slightly lower than the rear, or has too much weight on it, the tire want to grip and turn however the rear wheels under power want to track forward or still.
4.Thus you get a force (vector) that wants to push the vehicle forward and into the ground (now that the vehicle is no longer using all of its power to go staight, some of that enegy is focused down into the ground....moments before and during a turn)

...this resistance to turning (pushing down and into the ground...still going staight is)...or... "pushing."

Therefore, If we raise the frontend of our bikes via....umm...larger tires when we brake or initiate a turn the front starts off higher and stays proportionally higher thus vectoring less force into the ground and the tires are able to change the direction of the vehicle without fighting the momentum of the bike going forward. Granted as with everything if we keep going bigger and bigger we are going to run into a situation where we don't have enough weight on the front tire to turn the vehicle and thus creating a similar issue. (all about moderation)

I don't know if that will help you...its about as clear as mud but the best I could do right now. its been a horribly long day.

oh and sorry about the horrible spelling....just dont care right now
 

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Less force/weight is directed towards the ground by elevating the front....
This in mind...
1. Our tires are run at low psi, compress, and grip well.
2.When we brake or initiate a turn the front suspention is going to "dive" a bit placing the front of the bike lower than the rear of the bike.(realativly) Not to mention our low psi tires compress further lowering the bike.
3.This is due to the new force (direction change) applied to the bike. If the front is slightly lower than the rear, or has too much weight on it, the tire want to grip and turn however the rear wheels under power want to track forward or still.
4.Thus you get a force (vector) that wants to push the vehicle forward and into the ground (now that the vehicle is no longer using all of its power to go staight, some of that enegy is focused down into the ground....moments before and during a turn)

...this resistance to turning (pushing down and into the ground...still going staight is)...or... "pushing."

Therefore, If we raise the frontend of our bikes via....umm...larger tires when we brake or initiate a turn the front starts off higher and stays proportionally higher thus vectoring less force into the ground and the tires are able to change the direction of the vehicle without fighting the momentum of the bike going forward. Granted as with everything if we keep going bigger and bigger we are going to run into a situation where we don't have enough weight on the front tire to turn the vehicle and thus creating a similar issue. (all about moderation)

I don't know if that will help you...its about as clear as mud but the best I could do right now. its been a horribly long day.

oh and sorry about the horrible spelling....just dont care right now

Wow, i feel like i just finished a episode of Mythbusters... lol j/k. That is a very good description. I can attest that its true, the 23's help. On my first few rides with the 700 i experienced this push, and didn't like it (i thought i was just inexperienced at riding a quad with IRS). I read what people were saying about the 23's on the front and thought what the hell, ill try it. I was experiencing the push about 1 outa every 3 turns at The Ridge. With the 23's i haven't experienced it one single time. I'm not a Scientist or a Engineer so i wont try to go technical about it, but i will say that they work.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Great explination! That was exactly what I was looking for. Thanks a ton
 

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Less force/weight is directed towards the ground by elevating the front....
This in mind...
1. Our tires are run at low psi, compress, and grip well.
2.When we brake or initiate a turn the front suspention is going to "dive" a bit placing the front of the bike lower than the rear of the bike.(realativly) Not to mention our low psi tires compress further lowering the bike.
3.This is due to the new force (direction change) applied to the bike. If the front is slightly lower than the rear, or has too much weight on it, the tire want to grip and turn however the rear wheels under power want to track forward or still.
4.Thus you get a force (vector) that wants to push the vehicle forward and into the ground (now that the vehicle is no longer using all of its power to go staight, some of that enegy is focused down into the ground....moments before and during a turn)

...this resistance to turning (pushing down and into the ground...still going staight is)...or... "pushing."

Therefore, If we raise the frontend of our bikes via....umm...larger tires when we brake or initiate a turn the front starts off higher and stays proportionally higher thus vectoring less force into the ground and the tires are able to change the direction of the vehicle without fighting the momentum of the bike going forward. Granted as with everything if we keep going bigger and bigger we are going to run into a situation where we don't have enough weight on the front tire to turn the vehicle and thus creating a similar issue. (all about moderation)

I don't know if that will help you...its about as clear as mud but the best I could do right now. its been a horribly long day.

oh and sorry about the horrible spelling....just dont care right now
I am now understanding how the tires work,Now can you explain where babys come from?:hey:
 

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The taller tire will have a larger contact patch.
 

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also look up physics of understeer instead of "push" on google and it will talk more about the forces involved. Wiki has a decent article. Keep in mind ...i'm not an engineer, know only basic physics....but that i how i think of understeer as related to the suspension setup on our quads.
 
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